Snoring, Early Signs of Heart Disease

Snoring, Early Signs of Heart Disease

Snoring Heart Disease
Snoring Heart Disease

Snoring is experienced by almost everyone, especially if sleeping in conditions that are very tired. But when people Snoring every day with a loud voice, could increase the risk and early signs of heart disease.

People who snore loudly, have difficulty sleeping or wake up feeling tired more often nod off at work. A new study shows that these conditions can increase the risk of heart disease and other health problems.

In the study, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh studied more than 800 people between the ages of 45 and 74 years of quality sleep. Three years later, those who reported snoring loudly two times more likely to have metabolic syndrome, which is a risk factor for heart disease, diabetes and stroke.

Metabolic syndrome includes high blood pressure, high blood sugar, low good cholesterol (HDL), high triglycerides and excess abdominal fat.

“Chronic sleep disorders can produce high levels of stress hormones and have excessive cardiovascular response, which can cause changes in blood pressure, glucose metabolism and weight,” said the study’s lead author, Wendy Troxel, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Pittsburgh, reported by CNN on Monday (6/12/2010).

According to Troxel, sleep problems can directly contribute to the risk factors for heart disease and diabetes. Body vibration caused by snoring can increase inflammation, which potentially damage the inner lining of arteries.

“Sleep problems are a big problem. Snoring can be a sign of respiratory problems that eventually can cause heart attacks and strokes. It can shorten your life,” says Jordan Josephson, MD, ENT specialist from Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Based on previous research, sleep disorders can also be caused by obstruction of the upper airway during sleep, loud snoring can be one of the symptoms. Sleep disorders are very closely associated with obesity, high blood pressure, heart failure and stroke.

“Doctors have to start asking patients about their sleep quality in order to measure the risk of heart disease and diabetes. Snoring and sleep deprivation must be addressed immediately, before it ended up being a serious disease,” said Hormoz Ashtyani, MD, medical director of the Institute for Sleep-Wake Disorders at Hackensack University Medical Center, New Jersey.